Email Print

CU-ICAR unveils 3rd vehicle prototype


Staff Report
Published Oct. 31, 2012

The Clemson University International Center for Automotive Research unveiled the latest prototype vehicle students created in partnership with manufacturers.

Automotive engineering students at the Greenville research campus designed and engineered the vehicle in partnership with Mazda North American Operations and the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, Calif.

CU-ICAR’s Deep Orange 3 vehicle accelerates from zero to 60 miles per hour in 7.5 seconds with a top speed of 125 mph. (Photo/Provided)
CU-ICAR’s Deep Orange 3 vehicle accelerates from zero to 60 miles per hour in 7.5 seconds with a top speed of 125 mph. (Photo/Provided)
The project is part of the Deep Orange program, now in its third year. The program provides students with experience in financial and market analysis, vehicle design, development, prototyping and production planning, and gives them an opportunity to work with automotive industry partners to develop ideas.

The Deep Orange 3 vehicle is the first students built from scratch. It was unveiled Wednesday at the 2012 Specialty Equipment Market Association show in Las Vegas. The annual show attracts more than 120,000 attendees and more than 2,000 exhibitors to the Las Vegas Convention Center.

Deep Orange 3 features a TwinEngine hybrid powertrain that automatically chooses front-, rear- or all-wheel drive; and a load-bearing structure based on sheet-folding technology patented by Industrial Origami.

The vehicle accelerates from zero to 60 miles per hour in 7.5 seconds with a top speed of 125 mph, achieving 42 city and 49 highway miles per gallon.

“The students’ design is truly innovative,” said Paul Venhovens, BMW endowed chair in automotive systems integration at CU-ICAR, in a news release. “With each new concept the class must push the boundaries of conventional thinking to produce a vehicle that is both groundbreaking and functional.”

Deep Orange runs the course of two academic years in parallel with Clemson’s two-year master’s program in automotive engineering.

Robert Davis, senior vice president of U.S. operations for Mazda North American Operations and a Clemson alumnus, said in a news release the experiences Clemson students gain from Deep Orange makes them very attractive to industry.

“These engineers will design and build the cars we drive tomorrow,” Davis said. “The work they contribute to the Deep Orange project is outstanding, and we at Mazda are honored to support their efforts.”

Do you give this article a thumbs up? Thumbs_upYes

Comments: